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In the News

"Call Your Senate Judiciary Member And Ask To Support Immigration Reform"

By immigration lawyer Gintare Grigaite, Esq.

House Immigration Bill Is Said to Offer 3 Paths


President Obama Remarks on Signing of Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)



By immigration lawyer Gintare Grigaite, Esq.

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Begin Accepting Provisional Waivers

Beginning March 4, 2013, certain immigrant visa applicants who are the spouses, children and parents of U.S. citizens (immediate relatives), and have been unlawfully present in the United States, can start applying for provisional unlawful presence waivers through a new process.

The new provisional unlawful presence waiver process is for certain individuals who seek a waiver of inadmissibility only for unlawful presence. They can now apply for a provisional unlawful presence waiver while in the United States and before departing for their immigrant visa interview at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate abroad. Under the current process, which continues to remain in effect, immediate relatives of U.S. citizens who are not eligible to adjust status in the United States have to travel abroad and be found inadmissible at their immigrant visa interview before they can apply for an inadmissibility waiver.

The new process is expected to shorten the time U.S. citizens are separated from their immediate relatives while those family members go through the process of becoming lawful permanent residents of the United States.

For eligibility details and information about the process, please contact immigration lawyer Gintare Grigaite, Esq. to make an appointment.



U VISA

By immigration lawyer Gintare Grigaite, Esq.

U nonimmigrant status provides immigration protection to crime victims of qualifying criminal activity who have suffered substantial mental or physical abuse as a result of the crime. The U visa allows victims to remain in the United States and provides temporary immigration benefits to victims as well as their qualifying family members, including ability to obtain employment authorization.

The U visa is a self-petitioning application, and does not require a sponsor. However, unlike a T nonimmigrant visa, the U visa applicant requires a Law Enforcement Certification on Form I-918 Supplement B, and reasonable cooperation with the law enforcement. If granted U nonimmigrant visa status, a victim can ultimately adjust status in the United States, to become a lawful permanent resident.

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible for a U visa, a victim must:

  • Be a victim of qualifying criminal activity and suffered substantial physical or mental abuse as a result of the crime.
  • Possess information about the qualifying criminal activity.
  • Have been, is being, or is likely to be helpful to the investigation and/or prosecution of that qualifying criminal activity.
  • Be a victim of criminal activity that occurred in the U.S. or violated a U.S. law.

Qualifying Criminal Activity

Victims of the following crimes qualify for a U visa:

  • Abduction
  • Blackmail
  • Domestic Violence
  • Extortion
  • False Imprisonment
  • Felonious Assault
  • Female Genital Mutilation
  • Hostage
  • Incest
  • Involuntary Servitude
  • Kidnapping
  • Manslaughter
  • Murder
  • Obstruction of Justice
  • Peonage
  • Perjury
  • Prostitution
  • Rape
  • Sexual Assault
  • Sexual Contact (abusive)
  • Sexual Exploitation
  • Slave Trade
  • Torture
  • Trafficking
  • Unlawful Criminal Restraint
  • Witness Tampering

Please note, attempt, conspiracy, or solicitation to commit any of these crimes, as well as crimes not listed above, but that are "substantially similar" to the above crimes, also fall under the required qualifying criminal activity.

See INA §101(a)(15)(U)(iii); 8 C.F.R. §214.14(a)(9).


Senate Judiciary Committee Holds Hearing on "Comprehensive Immigration Reform" 02/13/2013

​[Click Here]


NY Times: A New Bipartisan Team Tackles Immigration

​[Click Here]


Six Things You Need To Know About Stateside Processing of I-601A Waivers

​[Click Here]


New York Times: Immigration Change to Ease Family Separation

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Secretary Napolitano Announces Final Rule to Support Family Unity During Waiver Process

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Visa Bulletin for January 2013

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Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

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USCIS Reminds Eligible National of Haiti to Re-register for Temporary Protected Status

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USCIS to Implement New $165 Immigrant Fee on February 1, 2013

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NBC Latino: 2013 Latino Political Wish List

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The Washington Times: Obama Says Immigration Reform Will Be Priority

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US News and World Report: Republicans Reconsidering Immigration Reform

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